History Podcasts

British soldier allegedly spares the life of an injured Adolf Hitler

British soldier allegedly spares the life of an injured Adolf Hitler


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

On September 28, 1918, in an incident that would go down in the lore of World War I history—although the details of the event are still unclear—Private Henry Tandey, a British soldier serving near the French village of Marcoing, reportedly encounters a wounded German soldier and declines to shoot him, sparing the life of 29-year-old Lance Corporal Adolf Hitler.

Tandey, a native of Warwickshire, took part in the First Battle of Ypres in October 1914 and the Battle of the Somme in 1916, where he was wounded in the leg. After being discharged from the hospital, he was transferred to the 9th Battalion in France and was wounded again during the Third Battle of Ypres at Passchendaele in the summer of 1917. From July to October 1918, Tandey served with the 5th Duke of Wellington Regiment; it was during this time that he took part in the successful British capture of Marcoing, for which he earned a Victoria Cross for “conspicuous bravery.”

As Tandey later told sources, during the final moments of that battle, as the German troops were in retreat, a wounded German soldier entered Tandey’s line of fire. “I took aim but couldn’t shoot a wounded man,” Tandey remembered, “so I let him go.” The German soldier nodded in thanks, and disappeared.

Though sources do not exist to prove the exact whereabouts of Adolf Hitler on that day in 1918, an intriguing link emerged to suggest that he was in fact the soldier Tandey spared. A photograph that appeared in London newspapers of Tandey carrying a wounded soldier at Ypres in 1914 was later portrayed on canvas in a painting by the Italian artist Fortunino Matania glorifying the Allied war effort. As the story goes, when British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain traveled to Germany in 1938 to engage Hitler in a last-ditch effort to avoid another war in Europe, he was taken by the führer to his new country retreat in Bavaria. There, Hitler showed Chamberlain his copy of the Matania painting, commenting, “That’s the man who nearly shot me.”

The authenticity of the Tandey-Hitler encounter remains in dispute, though evidence does suggest that Hitler had a reproduction of the Matania painting as early as 1937—a strange acquisition for a man who had been furious and devastated by the German defeat at Allied hands in the Great War. Twice decorated as a soldier, Hitler was temporarily blinded by a mustard gas attack in Belgium in October 1918 and was in a military hospital in Pacewalk, Germany, when he received news of the German surrender. The experiences of battle—first glory and ultimately disillusion and despondence—would color the rest of Hitler’s life and career, as he admitted in 1941, after leading his country into another devastating conflict: “When I returned from the War, I brought back home with me my experiences at the front; out of them I built my National Socialist community.”

READ MORE: When Hitler Tried (and Failed) to Be an Artist


Irish history, folklore and all that

Tandey, a native of Warwickshire, took part in the First Battle of Ypres in October 1914 and the Battle of the Somme in 1916, where he was wounded in the leg. After being discharged from the hospital, he was transferred to the 9th Battalion in France and was wounded again during the Third Battle of Ypres at Passchendaele in the summer of 1917. From July to October 1918, Tandey served with the 5th Duke of Wellington Regiment it was during this time that he took part in the successful British capture of Marcoing, for which he earned a Victoria Cross for “conspicuous bravery.”

As Tandey later told sources, during the final moments of that battle, as the German troops were in retreat, a wounded German soldier entered Tandey’s line of fire. “I took aim but couldn’t shoot a wounded man,” Tandey remembered, “so I let him go.” The German soldier nodded in thanks, and disappeared.

Though sources do not exist to prove the exact whereabouts of Adolf Hitler on that day in 1918, an intriguing link emerged to suggest that he was in fact the soldier Tandey spared. A photograph that appeared in London newspapers of Tandey carrying a wounded soldier at Ypres in 1914 was later portrayed on canvas in a painting by the Italian artist Fortunino Matania glorifying the Allied war effort. As the story goes, when British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain traveled to Germany in 1938 to engage Hitler in a last-ditch effort to avoid another war in Europe, he was taken by the führer to his new country retreat in Bavaria. There, Hitler showed Chamberlain his copy of the Matania painting, commenting, “That’s the man who nearly shot me.”

The authenticity of the Tandey-Hitler encounter remains in dispute, though evidence does suggest that Hitler had a reproduction of the Matania painting as early as 1937—a strange acquisition for a man who had been furious and devastated by the German defeat at Allied hands in the Great War. Twice decorated as a soldier, Hitler was temporarily blinded by a mustard gas attack in Belgium in October 1918 and was in a military hospital in Pacewalk, Germany, when he received news of the German surrender. The experiences of battle—first glory and ultimately disillusion and despondence—would color the rest of Hitler’s life and career, as he admitted in 1941, after leading his country into another devastating conflict: “When I returned from the War, I brought back home with me my experiences at the front out of them I built my National Socialist community.”


La 28 septembrie 1918, într-un incident care ar fi trecut în istoria Primului Război Mondial, deși detaliile evenimentului încă nu sunt clare. Privat Henry Tandey, un soldat britanic care slujea în apropiere de satul francez Marcoing, a întâlnit un rănit soldat german și refuză să-l împuște, scutind viața caporalului Lance, în vârstă de 29 de ani, Adolf Hitler.

Tandey, originar din Warwickshire, a luat parte la prima bătălie de la Ypres în octombrie 1914 și la bătălia din Somme în 1916, unde a fost rănit la picior. După ce a fost externat din spital, a fost transferat la Batalionul 9 din Franța și a fost rănit din nou în timpul celei de-a treia bătălii de la Ypres, la Passchendaele, în vara lui 1917. Din iulie până în octombrie 1918, Tandey a servit cu Regimentul 5 Ducele de Wellington în această perioadă a luat parte la reușita captură britanică a lui Marcoing, pentru care a obținut o Cruce Victoria pentru „vitejie vizibilă”.

După cum Tandey a spus mai târziu unor surse, în ultimele momente ale acelei bătălii, în timp ce trupele germane erau în retragere, un soldat german rănit a intrat pe linia de foc a lui Tandey. „Mi-am propus, dar nu am putut împușca un rănit”, și-a amintit Tandey, „așa că l-am lăsat să plece.” Soldatul german a dat din cap în semn de mulțumire și a dispărut.

Deși nu există surse care să dovedească locul exact al lui Adolf Hitler în acea zi din 1918, a apărut o legătură intrigantă care să sugereze că a fost de fapt soldatul Tandey. O fotografie apărută în ziarele londoneze ale lui Tandey care transporta un soldat rănit la Ypres în 1914 a fost mai târziu portretizată pe pânză într-un tablou al artistului italian Fortunino Matania glorificând efortul de război aliat. După cum se întâmplă povestea, când premierul britanic Neville Chamberlain a călătorit în Germania în 1938 pentru a-l angaja pe Hitler într-un ultim efort de a evita un alt război în Europa, el a fost dus de führer în noua sa retragere din Bavaria. Acolo, Hitler i-a arătat lui Chamberlain copia picturii lui Matania, comentând: „Acesta este omul care m-a împușcat aproape”.

Autenticitatea întâlnirii de la Tandey-Hitler rămâne în dispută, deși dovezi sugerează că Hitler a avut o reproducere a picturii Matania încă din 1937, o dobândire ciudată pentru un bărbat care a fost furios și devastat de înfrângerea germană la mâinile Aliate în Marele Război. De două ori decorat ca soldat, Hitler a fost temporar orbit de un atac cu gaz de muștar în Belgia, în octombrie 1918 și s-a aflat într-un spital militar din Pacewalk, Germania, când a primit știri despre predarea germană. Experiențele de primă glorie de luptă și, în cele din urmă, deziluzie și deznădejde ar colora restul vieții și carierei lui Hitler, după cum a recunoscut în 1941, după ce și-a condus țara într-un alt conflict devastator: „Când m-am întors din război, m-am readus acasă. cu mine experiențele mele din față din ele mi-am construit comunitatea național-socialistă. ”


The Man Who Didn’t Kill Adolf Hitler

Adolf Hitler, one of the most heinous and ruthless dictators to have ever lived, caused a preposterous amount of pain and suffering through his career. As the story goes, a man named Henry Tandey could have prevented Hitler’s crimes against humanity with a single bullet in 1918. Regrettably, he did not take the shot.

The Whole Bushel

On September 28, 1918, in an event that would go down in World War I history, Private Henry Tandey, a British soldier who served near the French village of Marcoing says he came face to face with a wounded 29-year-old Adolf Hitler. It would have required minimal effort for Tandey to take a fatal shot and end Hitler’s life considering he had been shooting at Germans all day. However, as a wounded, limping soldier appeared from the smoke into his sights, Tandey stood his ground and held his fire.

Hitler nodded his thanks and disappeared. Tandey could have changed the course of history within seconds, but he felt sympathy towards Hitler. Tandey would not recall this event for another 20 years.

In order to avoid the outbreak of war in 1938, the UK prime minister, Neville Chamberlain, visited Adolf Hitler in Germany. Hitler invited Chamberlain to his retreat in Berchtesgaden in Bavaria. His retreat was extravagantly and splendidly enhanced with works of German art. Hitler had a copy of Fortunio Matania’s depiction of Private Tandey hanging on the wall, and this magnificent work of art stood out for Chamberlain. Chamberlain inquired Hitler regarding the painting, Hitler’s response was:

“That man came so near to killing me that I thought I should never see Germany again providence saved me from such devilishly accurate fire as those English boys were aiming at us.”

Hitler requested that Chamberlain would pass his many thanks to Private Tandey, which Chamberlain later did by phone call. The next year, war broke out. Tandey narrowly escaped death during the Blitz, and he later informed a journalist, “If only I had known what he would turn out to be. When I saw all the people and woman and children he had killed and wounded, I was sorry to God I let him go.”

Tandey was haunted for the rest of his life by his failure to kill Hitler in 1918. At the age of 49, our brave hero attempted to rejoin his old regiment, informing everyone that Hitler wouldn’t escape a second time. He was however, unsuccessful. Private Tandey died aged 86 in 1977 in Coventry, significantly outliving Adolf Hitler.


Did a British Soldier Accidentally Spare Hitler’s Life in 1918?

What would the world have been like if Adolf Hitler had never seen a rise to power? We may have come really close to finding out in September 1918, at least according to the dictator.

If you believe Hitler's story, it was on September 28 that, as a young Lance Corporal (top row, second from the right in the picture above), he found himself in the path of Private Henry Tandey, who would go on to become the most decorated British soldier of the war. Hitler was injured and unable to fight, and it was because of that, he said, that Tandey spared him.

"That man came so near to killing me that I thought I should never see Germany again," the dictator allegedly said. "Providence saved me from such devilish accurate fire as those English boys were aiming at us.”

Hitler claimed to have discovered the identity of the man who saved him when he spotted Tandey depicted in a famous painting by Italian artist Fortunino Matania. But experts are doubtful that this encounter ever occurred, in part because there are records showing that his military unit was 50 miles south of Tandey's on September 28. Additionally, Hitler had been on military leave for the two days prior—September 28 would have been his first day back.

Dr. David Johnson, who wrote a biography of Pvt. Henry Tandey, believes the dictator invented the story to further perpetuate his own mythos: "With his god-like self-perception, the story added to his own myth—that he had been spared for something greater, that he was somehow 'chosen.'"

For his part, Tandey usually chose his words carefully when he discussed the event. Though he acknowledged that he had spared enemy lives on that date, he didn’t remember Hitler at all (though he would have looked much different). But after his hometown of Coventry, England, was bombed in 1940, Tandey was quoted as saying, “If only I had known what he would turn out to be. When I saw all of the women and children he had killed and wounded, I was sorry to God I let him go.”

If he had been killed, though, would it have made a difference? Hans Frank, Hitler’s personal lawyer, thought it would have. Before he was hanged at Nuremburg for his crimes, Frank said, “The Führer was a man who was possible in Germany only at that very moment. Had he come, let us say, 10 years later, when the republic was firmly established, it would have been impossible for him. And if he had come 10 years previously, or at any time when there was still the monarchy, he would have gotten nowhere. He came at exactly this terrible transitory period when the monarchy had gone and the republic was not yet secure.”

Historian Henry Ashby Turner Jr., author of Thirty Days to Power, speculates that without Hitler, Germany would have fallen under a military government. That government would have likely turned its attention to domination of the Polish Corridor. This would have resulted in a conflict between Germany and Poland, but not the entire world—and World War II would have been avoided entirely.


No telephone

On returning to Britain, Mr Chamberlain is alleged to have phoned Pte Tandey to pass on details of the exchange he had with Hitler.

He was out at the time, so a nephew apparently took the call.

Dr Johnson is highly sceptical the call was made, not least because Mr Chamberlain was a very busy man.

"I can't see him spending time tracking down and telephoning a Private," he said.

"He also sent long and detailed letters to his sisters and kept diaries. Nowhere in his papers was the Tandey affair mentioned."

British Telecom archives add more doubt - Pte Tandey did not have a telephone.

But the story has persisted, having probably first come to light at a regimental event in 1938 where, Dr Johnson said, Pte Tandey was told by an officer who had heard it from Mr Chamberlain.

"We don't know whether Tandey was taken to one side and told privately - or whether it was a jocular part of an after-dinner speech, or something like that," he said.

Pte Tandey himself was noncommittal about it. He acknowledged he had spared soldiers on 28 September, and was initially prepared to entertain the idea - but always made a point of saying he needed more information to confirm it.

He was quoted in an August 1939 edition of the Coventry Herald as saying: "According to them, I've met Adolf Hitler.

"Maybe they're right but I can't remember him."

But a year later, he appeared to be more certain, when a journalist approached him outside his bombed Coventry home, asking him about his alleged encounter with Hitler.

"If only I had known what he would turn out to be," Pte Tandey is quoted as saying.

"When I saw all the people and women and children he had killed and wounded I was sorry to God I let him go."

The newspapers seemed to say it all:

"Nothing Henry did that night could ease his sickening sense of guilt."

"It was a stigma that Tandey lived with until his death"

"He could have stopped this. He could have changed the course of history"

However, there is no evidence, not even anecdotal, he was either hounded or avoided after the claims.


The man in the painting

Let’s jump some twenty years forward in time. In September 1938, British PM Neville Chamberlain was invited to Hitler’s Berghof to negotiate with the Führer. To his surprise, the politician was shown a curious painting depicting the 1914 Battle of Ypres. ‘That man came so near to killing me that I thought I should never see Germany again’, Hitler said, pointing at a British soldier on the painting. On the latter, drawn from a 1914 press report, Führer had recognized the man who had spared him: Henry Tandey. According to legend, Chamberlain called Tandey upon his return in Great Britain to send him the Führer’s best wishes…

This painting by Italian artist Fortunino Matania depicts Tandey’s unit after the Battle of Ypres. Some claim Tandey is the man carrying a wounded soldier on his back. (Credit: The Green Howards Museum)

Hitler himself, then, identified Tandey as his ‘savior’: that should prove good enough for historians, right? Think again: actually, it is hard to believe Corporal Hitler was even in Marcoing on the day the events took place. According to the Bavarian State Archives, he was on leave until the 27th, so he probably did not reach northern France on time to fight the following day.


4 Evading A Death Sentence


After the arrest, Hitler was charged with treason. The punishment for treason at the time in the Weimar Republic was death. And yet, oddly enough, Hitler was never put to death for his conviction for treason in 1923.

Shortly before Hitler&rsquos trial, the Weimar government declared a state of emergency that drastically changed their judicial system. Consequently, Hitler would no longer have a trial by jury. Instead, judges would decide Hitler&rsquos fate. The judge assigned to Hitler&rsquos case, George Neithardt, was actually sympathetic to Hitler&rsquos fascist views and even participated in Nazi-esque right-wing groups around the time.

Judge Neithardt abandoned giving Hitler any semblance of a legitimate trial and let Hitler lecture the public in court, using the trial as a vehicle for spreading his political messaging. As Hitler&rsquos right-wing diatribes in court spread out to the general public, he skyrocketed to the top of fascist politics, which would allow him to seize power with the Nazi party shortly after.

Hitler was technically convicted of treason, but instead of receiving a death sentence, he was sentenced to five years in prison, of which he only served a mere nine months.


Irish history, folklore and all that

In A Nutshell

Adolf Hitler, one of the most heinous and ruthless dictators to have ever lived, caused a preposterous amount of pain and suffering through his career. As the story goes, a man named Henry Tandey could have prevented Hitler’s crimes against humanity with a single bullet in 1918. Regrettably, he did not take the shot.

The Whole Bushel

On September 28, 1918, in an event that would go down in World War I history, Private Henry Tandey, a British soldier who served near the French village of Marcoing says he came face to face with a wounded 29-year-old Adolf Hitler. It would have required minimal effort for Tandey to take a fatal shot and end Hitler’s life considering he had been shooting at Germans all day. However, as a wounded, limping soldier appeared from the smoke into his sights, Tandey stood his ground and held his fire.

Hitler nodded his thanks and disappeared. Tandey could have changed the course of history within seconds, but he felt sympathy towards Hitler. Tandey would not recall this event for another 20 years.

In order to avoid the outbreak of war in 1938, the UK prime minister, Neville Chamberlain, visited Adolf Hitler in Germany. Hitler invited Chamberlain to his retreat in Berchtesgaden in Bavaria. His retreat was extravagantly and splendidly enhanced with works of German art. Hitler had a copy of Fortunio Matania’s depiction of Private Tandey hanging on the wall, and this magnificent work of art stood out for Chamberlain. Chamberlain inquired Hitler regarding the painting, Hitler’s response was:

“That man came so near to killing me that I thought I should never see Germany again providence saved me from such devilishly accurate fire as those English boys were aiming at us.”

Hitler requested that Chamberlain would pass his many thanks to Private Tandey, which Chamberlain later did by phone call. The next year, war broke out. Tandey narrowly escaped death during the Blitz, and he later informed a journalist, “If only I had known what he would turn out to be. When I saw all the people and woman and children he had killed and wounded, I was sorry to God I let him go.”

Tandey was haunted for the rest of his life by his failure to kill Hitler in 1918. At the age of 49, our brave hero attempted to rejoin his old regiment, informing everyone that Hitler wouldn’t escape a second time. He was however, unsuccessful. Private Tandey died aged 86 in 1977 in Coventry, significantly outliving Adolf Hitler.


The rest of the war

As the telephone replaced many of his duties, Hitler’s comrades in his regiment supposedly laughed at “Adi” for his aversion to smutty stories, and traded their jam rations for his tobacco.

A postcard sent by Hitler from Munich on 19 December 1916, where he explains how he wants to participate in the battles of the First World War voluntarily. Credit: Europeana / Commons.

Hitler was twice decorated for bravery. He received the relatively common Iron Cross Second Class in 1914 and the Iron Cross First Class in 1918, an honour rarely given to a Gefreiter.

Hitler’s First Class Iron Cross was recommended by Lieutenant Hugo Gutmann, a Jewish adjutant in the List Regiment.

Hitler’s medal was awarded after an attack in open warfare during which messengers were indispensable and on a day in which the depleted regiment lost 60 killed and 211 wounded.

There is a story that a British soldier chose to save Adolf Hitler’s life in the last years of the war.

The most decorated private soldier of World War One in Britain, Henry Tandey allegedly had the chance to shoot Adolf Hitler and other members of his regiment, but could not bring himself to do it. Hitler apparently told this story to Chamberlain during negotiations in the 1930s.

On 16 August Adolf Hitler was accepted as a war volunteer. The Führer with his war comrades of the Bavarian Reserve Infantry Regiment 16, to which he belonged up to the end of war. Credit: German Federal Archives / Commons.

Further studies have suggested that this story is completely untrue, as it seems extremely unlikely that Hitler would have been able to recognise Private Tandey, as his biographer suggests he was “extremely dishevelled and covered in mud and blood”.

Hitler was hospitalised in Pomerania, in Prussia. While he was there, he learned of Germany’s defeat.

Hitler was also supposedly on leave on the date of the incident, 28 September 1918, and it’s almost too convenient that the most honoured British soldier happened to be the one to spare Hitler’s life. It seems much more likely that Hitler constructed the narrative, choosing the most prominent British soldier for his story.

On 15 October 1918, he and several comrades were temporarily blinded due to a British mustard-gas attack.

Hitler was hospitalised in Pomerania, in Prussia. While he was there, he learned of Germany’s defeat.


2 Nazi U-Boats Blow Up a Passenger Liner and Then Save the Survivors

Yes, the Nazis make this list twice.

In World War II, German U-boats were tasked with sinking freighters and other supply ships based on the theory that countries with no food, supplies or fuel tend to surrender quickly. So, one night in 1943, the captain of U-156 noticed a rather large ship, and knowing he wasn't there to watch ships go by, ordered it torpedoed.

He was he surprised to find out it was not a freighter or a military ship, but a civilian ocean liner called the Laconia. It was full of civilians and Italian POWs.

The crew of U-156 then did something extraordinary: They surfaced and began picking up survivors. They were soon joined by U-506 and, at the order of Admiral Karl Donitz, two additional U-boats. Even with all these subs, there were still plenty of people in the water. So the Germans did something even more amazing: They offered safe passage to Allied merchants who came to pick up survivors. Indeed, the Brits were even sending ships to pick up folks.

Nobody bothered telling that to one of the U.S. anti-submarine bomber squadrons that regularly patrolled the area. When one of the pilots radioed back about U-boats on the surface towing lifeboats crowded with people, the squadron commander figured it must be either a trick or yet another party he wasn't invited to. Accordingly he told the pilot to bomb the subs, which the pilot attempted unsuccessfully. We like to think it's because he knew his commander was probably wrong and missed on purpose. The U-boats submerged, having significantly assisted in the rescue of the Laconia survivors.

This sort of thing wasn't an isolated incident. In the time that the German Admiral Donitz served (he would eventually become the German Navy Commander-in-Chief), it wasn't unusual for the U-boats to surface near any surviving lifeboats and pass out food, water and nautical maps. Though they'd specifically been ordered not to do this kind of thing by their government, they did it anyway, and Donitz unofficially sanctioned it.

After the war, Donitz was brought up on charges at the Nuremberg trials, along with his comrades. Fleet Admiral Chester Nimitz was sitting in with the good guys, and had also been a submariner. Though Nimitz didn't particularly like Donitz, he wasn't gonna just sit by and watch his opposite number get hanged simply for being good at his job.

When guilt was determined and sentences were handed down, Donitz received 10 years in prison rather than the customary death penalty. As far as defendants went at the trials, he got off with the least punishment because his former enemy was able to show that Donitz had been doing a legitimate military job. And though the "I was just following orders" excuses given by folks like Adolf Eichmann didn't fly, Donitz's compassionate U-boat rescue policy earned him a few brownie points in the end.


Watch the video: The Man who Spared Hitlers Life and one who Saved it (May 2022).


Comments:

  1. Shaktishicage

    Instead of criticizing, write the variants.

  2. Jarmann

    In my opinion, this is a delusion.

  3. Pollux

    likely yes

  4. Vuzshura

    And it is effective?

  5. Vur

    it is the special case.

  6. Marty

    Brilliant phrase and it is duly



Write a message